A contribution to the pathology of orbital tumors being a study of the secondary processes in the periosteum and bones of the orbit and vicinity by Charles Stedman Bull

Cover of: A contribution to the pathology of orbital tumors | Charles Stedman Bull

Published by D. Appleton & Co. in New York .

Written in English

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Subjects:

  • Ophthalmology,
  • Periosteum,
  • Eye-sockets,
  • Tumors,
  • Neoplasms,
  • Orbit,
  • Abnormalities

Edition Notes

Book details

Statementby Charles Stedman Bull
SeriesNew York medical journal
ContributionsUniversity College, London. Library Services
The Physical Object
Format[electronic resource] :
Pagination15 p. ;
Number of Pages15
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL25645030M

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Occupy Wall Street TV NSA Clip : Orbital Tumors also includes current staging of malignant orbital tumors, advances and techniques in surgical treatments, radiation advances and options, and the most recent chemotherapeutic therapies for both pediatric and adult tumors.

Orbital Tumors will become and indispensible tool not only for general ophthalmologists, but A contribution to the pathology of orbital tumors book for oculoplastic surgeons and orbitologists in their daily practice. The book has further reach as a reference for pediatricians, radiologists, pathologists.

Orbital Tumors, 2nd edition discusses advances in orbital disease and their treatment, offering readers an up-to-date, single volume reference for orbital tumors. Divided into two parts, this book covers everything from advances in oncogenesis and its relationship to orbital tumors, to medical genetics and the role of imaging in diagnosis of.

Written and edited by leaders in the fields of ophthalmology and oncology, Orbital Tumors, 2nd edition builds upon the first edition, proving to be a useful reference for orbital specialists.

Written and edited by leaders in the fields of ophthalmology and oncology, Orbital Tumors, 2nd edition builds upon the first edition, proving to be a useful reference for orbital specialists and of significant interest to everyone dealing with orbital pathology from a clinical and scientific point of view.

Springer Science & Business Media, - Medical - pages 0 Reviews Karcioglu's Orbital Tumors covers all phases in the diagnosis and treatment of orbital tumors -- from the initial evaluation.

ISBN: X OCLC Number: Description: xv, pages: illustrations (some color) ; 28 cm: Contents: 1 Molecular models of cancer development Immune surveillance and cancer pathogenesis The changing nature and behavior of orbital and periorbital tumors Mechanisms of tumor metastasis in the orbit Multiple malignancies in retinoblastoma Clinical.

Conclusion: Tumors of the orbit are always a great diagnostic problem. In orbital processes all diagnostic methods have to be used and the results from the treatment should be followed regularly.

Key words: orbital tumor, neoplasm, eye, proptosis INTRODUCTION Tumors of the orbit are rare diseases in ophthalmic pathology – - 4 % [1, 2]. This unsurpassed ocular oncology resource is a comprehensive guide to the clinical features, diagnosis, management, and pathology of eyelid, conjunctival, and orbital tumors and pseudotumors, depicting clinical variations,  treatment and histopathologic characteristics of the wide spectrum of neoplasms and related lesions.

Some types of orbital tumors usually cause proptosis and displacement of the globe in a direction opposite the tumor. Pain, diplopia, and vision loss may also be present.

The diagnosis of orbital tumors is suspected based on the history, examination, and neuroimaging (CT, MRI, or both), but confirmation often ultimately requires a biopsy. adult orbital tumor. They typically appear as a well-circumscribed, ovoid intraconal mass on cross-sectional images.

Lymphoma, which may be pri-mary or secondary to systemic disease, is the most prevalent orbital neo-plasm in older adults (≥60 years of age). Choroidal melanoma is the most common primary adult ocular malignancy. Orbital Tumors, 2nd edition discusses advances in orbital disease and their treatment, offering readers an up-to-date, single volume reference for orbital tumors.

Divided into two parts, this book covers everything from advances in oncogenesis and its relationship to orbital tumors, to medical genetics and the role of imaging in diagnosis of orbital tumors.

Original contribution. Orbital solitary fibrous tumor: encompassing terminology for hemangiopericytoma, giant cell angiofibroma, and fibrous histiocytoma of the orbit: reappraisal of 41 cases andwere retrieved from our consultation files, the Ophthalmic Registry, at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology.

Slides and clinical. The spectrum of pathology in pediatric orbital tumors is wide and requires multidisciplinary treatment. View. Show abstract. Idiopathic Orbital Inflammation: Distribution, Clinical Features, and.

Lavishly illustrated and clinically relevant, Orbital Tumors: Diagnosis and treatment presents a single-volume reference for orbital pathology in daily practice. Chapters written by leading practitioners in ophthalmology, obitology, radiology, pathology, neurosurgery, medical and radation oncology, and plastic surgery provide a range and depth of expertise unavailable elsewhere.

In summary, Orbital Tumors by Karcioglu is a very well-written and nicely illustrated book. It covers the subject comprehensively, and is current and a most approachable textbook.

It would be a very useful reference for the orbital specialist, of significant interest to the generalist and an ideal text for trainees. Page views in to date (this page and chapter topics):Actually the tumor can present anywhere along the optic tract from the occipital region to the chiasm and the optic nerve.

The term glioma is also rather non-specific. These tumors are juvenile pilocytic astrocytomas WHO type 1, which is the most benign form of astrocytoma. They make up 4% of all orbital tumors.

"Lavishly illustrated and clinically relevant, Orbital Tumors: Diagnosis and Treatment presents a single volume reference for orbital pathology in daily practice.

Orbital Tumors will become an indispensible tool not only for general ophthalmologists, but also for oculoplastic surgeons and orbitologists in. Orbital Tumors. Zeynel A. Karcioglu, MD, Editor. Springer, New York, ISBN X, $ Scope: This is a thorough exposition of the pathology, including pathogenesis, clinical, and investigation features, and treatment of ocular, orbital, and periocular tumors.

There are contributions from 30 individuals from around the world and extensive illustrations. A variety of lesions can affect the orbit (Table ). These lesions have variable clinical manifestations, operative indications, and treatment options, all of which are determined by the pathology.

Orbital tumors can occur in all areas of the orbit, and surgical approaches must be available to provide degrees of access. From to75 orbital tumors, originally coded as HPC, SFT, GCA, FH, and mixed tumors with features of 2 entities (HPC, SFT, or FH), were retrieved from our consultation files at the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology (AFIP).

Slides and clinical information extracted from our records were reviewed, analyzed, and compared. • Orbital tumors arising near the apex of the orbit often compresses the SOV leading to orbital venous congestion.

• Tumors in the anterior part of the middle cranial fossa may compress the exiting ophthalmic veins leading to a mild proptosis. • Development of a CCF results in the transmission of the arterial pressure into the. RESULTS: Among the 5 patients (3 men and 2 women) identified with primary orbital bone tumors, 4 cases were orbital osteoma and 1 case was a giant cell tumor (osteoclastoma).

The right orbit was involved in 2 patients and the left in 3 patients. Their mean age was 27 years (range = years). Mean follow-up was years (range = years).

Orbital Tumors, 2nd edition discusses advances in orbital disease and their treatment, offering readers an up-to-date, single volume reference for orbital tumors. By Roland Chisin (ed.) tic wisdom, a multidisciplinary procedure is indis­ during the last 60 years, radiology has gradually exposed the human physique.

at the start a fleshless skele­ pensable: clinicians, radiologists, surgeons, radio­ therapists, and pathologists needs to all give a contribution their ton for worldwide research, the physique then seemed in slices, until eventually with. Orbital Tumors The orbit is the bony “box” or structure located on either side of the nose that surrounds and protects the eyes and the tissue around the eyes.

Each orbit is a pear shaped structure, and is formed by seven different bones. Different types or tumors and growths in the orbit can occur around and behind the eye. Rhabdomyosarcoma is the most common mesenchymal tumor in children, accounting for about 5% of all childhood cancers (, 1, 2), and the most prevalent extraocular orbital malignancy in children, although it is only one-tenth as common as retinoblastoma, which is itself a rare tumor (, 3–, 5).

Several features make this book an important contribution to ophthalmic literature. Henderson has documented the clinical behavior of many different orbital tumors in an extensive Mayo Clinic series over a year period.

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Secondary orbital tumors. Günalp I(1), Gündüz K. Author information: (1)Ocular Oncology Department, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ankara, Turkey.

The authors reviewed their experience with secondary orbital tumor cases diagnosed histopathologically during imaging of orbital and visual pathway pathology of orbital and visual pathway pathology wibke s muller forell eugen boltshauser snippet view references to this book orbital tumors diagnosis and treatment zeynel a karcioglu limited preview w s muller forell ed imaging of orbital and visual pathway pathology with contributions by e.

T-staging of most eyelid malignancies includes the assessment of the integrity of the tarsal plate and orbital septum, which are not clinically accessible. Given the contribution of MRI in the characterization of orbital tumors and establishing their relations to nearby structures, we assessed its value in identifying different eyelid structures in 38 normal eyelids and evaluating tumor.

Orbital tumors in children are very rare and radiologic image, as magnetic resonance, is extremely important for correct diagnosis. We report six cases of different diagnosis of orbital tumors, comparing their images and clinical aspects. Radiologic images are essential for determine specific diagnosis in most cases of pediatric orbital pathology.

He has written/co-written 25 book chapters and edited/co-edited 10 books/monographs. Diagnostic ophthalmic pathology includes surgical pathology of ocular and periocular tissue, including cornea, vitreous, retina, uvea, conjunctiva, eyelid, and orbit. Ocular oncology includes conjunctival, retinal, iris, ciliary body and choroidal tumors.

Tumors with lateral intracranial extension (a significant number of orbital tumors) are best accessed by a pterional or fronto-orbital temporal craniotomy with or without orbitozygomatic osteotomies.

Another variant is the lateral microsurgical approach, which provides very good access for orbital tumors lateral to the optic nerve and apex. The cause of primary orbital tumors is unknown.

In children most orbital tumors result from developmental abnormalities. When visual loss or deterioration occurs with an orbital tumor, it may result from either mass effect, compromise of the vasculature to the optic apparatus as a result of the tumor, or invasion of the optic nerve by the tumor.

This unsurpassed ocular oncology resource is a comprehensive guide to the clinical features, diagnosis, management, and pathology of eyelid, conjunctival, and orbital tumors and pseudotumors, depicting clinical variations, treatment and histopathologic characteristics of the wide spectrum of neoplasms and related lesions.

Now brought thoroughly Reviews: 3. Paraorbital; PMID "Optimizing radiotherapy of orbital and paraorbital tumors: intensity-modulated X-ray beams vs. intensity-modulated proton beams." (Miralbell R, Int J Radiat Oncol Biol Phys.

Jul 1;47(4)) Treatment planning. 4 orbital/paraorbital tumors. IMRT vs IMPT. Outcome: PTV coverage comparable. Objective: To evaluate the origin and biological behavior of secondary orbital squamous cell (SCC) and mucoepidermoid carcinoma.

Methods: A retrospective review of 30 consecutive patients with SCC and mucoepidermoid carcinoma of the orbit seen over a period of 8 years at a large ophthalmic hospital in Saudi Arabia. Results: A total of 51 secondary orbital tumors were seen in the 8-year period.

This tumor can grow around the eye but rarely spreads to other parts of the body. Other types of common eyelid cancers include squamous carcinoma, sebaceous carcinoma and malignant melanoma.

The most common orbital malignancy is orbital lymphoma. This tumor can be diagnosed by biopsy with histopathologic and immunohistochemical analysis.Head and Neck Pathology E-Book. A Volume in the Series: Foundations in Diagnostic Pathology.

Author: Contributions from internationally recognized expert pathologists, keeping you up to date with the latest information in the field. and endoscopic approaches for sinonasal and orbital tumors, both extra- and intraconal.

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